Anderson: Deer hunting primer for 2019 season – Star Tribune

A: Deer feeding gathers deer unnaturally and increases the chances that disease can spread. Since many individuals who feed deer are non-hunters, we established the restrictions along county lines to make them simpler to comprehend, rather than by deer permit areas. A list of affected counties remains in the policy synopsis and online.

A: Correct. We have, however, recognized self-service drop-off places where hunters during these seasons can leave the heads of deer that are 1-year-old or older. They just submit a type and leave it at the drop-off website with their deer head. We get the heads, have them checked and, like arise from the other CWD testing we will do this fall, will post the outcomes online. Keep in mind, nevertheless, that carcass transport constraints apply in the early seasons in these locations.

Q: Hunters’ harvest limits have been substantially liberalized in the CWD management zones.

A: Previously it was 601. Now it’s 701. We did that since we’ve designated all CWD management zones 600-series locations. We believe this will be easier for hunters to keep track of.

Q: Explain the carcass movement restrictions of hunter-killed deer in the CWD management zones.

A: We want to decrease the sizes of the herds in these zones to decrease the opportunity CWD spreads. In the Southeast CWD Management Zone, a hunter can take up to three dollars in specific situations, one by archery, one by firearms and one by muzzleloader. And in both the Southeast and North-Central CWD Zones, unlimited antlerless deer can be taken, supplied hunters purchase required $2.50 illness management tags for each hunt. All 600 series license areas are likewise open during the early antlerless seasons.

Q: The number classification of the city deer permit area also has actually been changed.

In the interview below, Barbara Keller, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources big game program supervisor, information brand-new deer hunting opportunities and regulations in impact this year, consisting of establishment of a large chronic squandering illness (CWD) management zone in north-central Minnesota.

A: Whole deer carcasses can’t leave the North-Central and Southeast CWD Management Zones, or the southeast CWD Control Zone, which consists of authorization locations 343, 344 and 255, up until an unfavorable CWD test result has been returned. Hunters can take deer quarters or deboned meat out of these locations, so long as no part of the head or spine is connected. Total carcass-movement restrictions remain in the summary.

Q: One major change this year is facility of a statewide youth deer hunt, Oct. 17 through Oct. 20.

Q: Also new this year, hunters can utilize canines to discover injured deer.

A: Yes, the Legislature developed dog use for healing of a deer or a bear. A pet must be on a leash no longer than 30 feet. Other limitations also apply.

Q: Deer feeding and attractant bans also have been in impact because Sept. 1 in those locations and beyond.

Q: During the guns season, hunters in the Southeast and North-Central CWD Management Zones need to present their deer for screening. DNR staff will be stationed throughout the zones to do the testing. Now, throughout archery searching, and also during the upcoming youth hunt, no screening stations are available.

A: Possibly a small increase. Last winter season was hard in some locations of the northeast and the harvest might be down there. Otherwise, some authorization locations are more conservative this year than last in terms of available antlerless permits, and some areas are more liberal. Hunters ought to examine the DNR synopsis to see harvest guidelines that govern their license location.

Q: Hunters in 2015 eliminated 188,706 deer. Do you expect the same harvest this year?

A: Previously we had youth seasons in the northwest and southeast. Now it will be essentially statewide. The hunt is for youth ages 10 to 17. Youth ages 10 to 13 should have a coach with them. The older hunters don’t, but hunter education requirements apply as do harvest regulations for the locations they hunt. On the same dates is an early antlerless season in some parts of Minnesota.

A: Yes. The new zone, 604, is relatively big and hunters in that area should describe the map we’ve created in the guidelines and on the DNR website. Similar to the Southeast CWD Management Zone, the Southeast CWD Control Zone and the Central Surveillance Area, constraints use in the North-Central CWD Management Zone about screening of hunter-killed deer and about moving deer carcasses from these locations. An exception is that carcass transportation limitations do not use to the Central Surveillance Area.

Keller holds a postgraduate degree in wildlife science from the University of Missouri and was the Missouri Department of Conservation deer program supervisor prior to coming to Minnesota in January.

Q: The new North-Central CWD zone was established after a wild deer near a captive deer farm because area was found last year to have been infected with CWD.

Q: Have you had any favorable CWD tests returned up until now in the archery season?

A: No.

As with the Southeast CWD Management Zone, the Southeast CWD Control Zone and the Central Surveillance Area, restrictions use in the North-Central CWD Management Zone about testing of hunter-killed deer and about moving deer carcasses from these locations. A: Whole deer carcasses can’t leave the North-Central and Southeast CWD Management Zones, or the southeast CWD Control Zone, which includes authorization locations 343, 344 and 255, up until a negative CWD test result has been returned. A: Deer feeding gathers deer unnaturally and increases the chances that disease can spread. Because lots of people who feed deer are non-hunters, we developed the bans along county lines to make them easier to comprehend, rather than by deer permit areas. Q: During the firearms season, hunters in the Southeast and North-Central CWD Management Zones need to provide their deer for screening.

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