Ireland spends least across EU on obesity treatment – Irish Examiner

Acknowledgment of obesity as a disease and making treatment generally available would prevent cancer for some patients, said Professor Heneghan. Ireland has been at the leading edge of establishing cost-efficient obesity treatments, including operations and drugs, yet they are not readily available, she stated.

The society is now getting in touch with the HSE to make obesity treatments a part of universal public healthcare. And while the HSE does not recognise weight problems as a disease, the Department of Health currently does, stated Prof le Roux.

“With reliable treatment, the problem of this persistent disease can be reversed in a comparable way as has actually been attained with hypertension, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes and heart illness. Existing ‘consume less and move more’ public awareness programs are essential as prevention strategies, once somebody is overweight then this is inefficient for them.

“We have the affordable tools and the knowledge to do this, all we need is a change of policy from the HSE.”

“Relying on self-control and ethical strength to change biology has not been an effective management strategy and led to an exponential boost in individuals with weight problems,” she said.

There is a major shortage of public treatment, and a two-tier system, due to the fact that the HSE does not recognise it as a disease, said the society.

Speaking today on World Obesity Day, Prof le Roux stated: “Proven treatments, both surgery and economical medications, need to be offered to all based upon requirement. By not offering treatments, the HSE ends up paying a lot more for the long-term problems of weight problems.”

Consultant cosmetic surgeon at St Vincent’s University Hospital, Dublin Professor Helen Heneghan stated that blaming individuals for their weight problems is a “problematic strategy which leads to health disparities”. She said: “Obesity is a response to biologically-determined body weight regulation, and not gluttony or laziness.”

Ireland invests less on obesity treatment than any other EU nation in spite of more than a million individuals coping with the “treatable disease”.

Teacher Carel le Roux, representative for the Irish Society of Nutrition and Metabolism stated Ireland’s paltry financing for public weight problems is directly connected to it not being recognised as a persistent illness.

More than one million people, consisting of 50,000 kids have obesity.

Speaking today on World Obesity Day, Prof le Roux said: “Proven treatments, both surgical treatment and cost-efficient medications, ought to be available to all based upon requirement. Consultant cosmetic surgeon at St Vincent’s University Hospital, Dublin Professor Helen Heneghan stated that blaming people for their weight problems is a “flawed technique which leads to health disparities”. Acknowledgment of weight problems as an illness and making treatment universally readily available would prevent cancer for some clients, said Professor Heneghan.

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