Macomb County 7 cases of Legionnaires Disease under investigation at McLaren Macomb Hospital 8:07 PM – WXYZ

LD is an extreme infection that includes signs of fever, cough and radiologic findings consistent with pneumonia. After Legionella multiplies and grows in a building water system, water including Legionella can spread in beads small enough for individuals to breathe in. Individuals at greater risk for LD consist of those who are age 50 or older; have a present or previous cigarette smoking history; or have an underlying health problem or condition such as persistent lung kidney, liver or illness failure, diabetes, systemic malignancies, or immune system disorders due to medications or disease.

(WXYZ)– Officials with the Macomb County Health Department and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Service are examining what might be 7 possible cases of Legionnaires Disease at Mclaren Macomb Hospital.

The cases have been reported because late July, with 6 of the 7 cases being reported because mid September.

Authorities stress the examination is ongoing and a source has not been recognized. The hospital is complying.

The are also working to recognize any other patients who may have been contaminated.

Here is some information on Legionnaires and Legionella launched by the health department:

LD is a respiratory infection caused by Legionella germs. LD is a severe infection that consists of signs of fever, cough and radiologic findings consistent with pneumonia. Legionella germs are naturally happening in fresh water sources. The organism can increase in manmade water supply such as cooling towers, decorative fountains, jacuzzis and large building plumbing systems.

After Legionella increases and grows in a building water supply, water containing Legionella can spread out in droplets small enough for people to inhale. People can get LD when they take in little beads of water in the air that consist of the bacteria.

Individuals at higher threat for LD consist of those who are age 50 or older; have a existing or previous smoking history; or have an underlying disease or condition such as persistent lung liver, disease or kidney failure, diabetes, systemic malignancies, or immune system disorders due to medications or illness. Recent travel and over night stays in health centers or other health care facilities can increase an individual’s risk for exposure to LD.

Clients with pneumonia need to be tested for LD if they have any of the following histories:
Have failed outpatient antibiotic treatment for community-acquired pneumonia.Are immunocompromised.Are confessed to
the ICU.Traveled within 10 days prior to signonset.Were recently hospitalized.Developed pneumonia ≥ 48 hours afterhealthcare facility admission. If you are concerned about possible signs of pneumonia you must contact
your medical care supplier. Additional information regarding LD is readily available

from the CDC site at Cdc.gov/ legionella.

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